Statement from the Personal Care Products Council on Sunscreen Regulations in COVID-19 Legislation


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

CONTACTS:

Lisa Powers, (202) 297-1232, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org
Jamie Kurke, (202) 258-5285, kurkej@personalcarecouncil.org

Washington, D.C. – “Today, President Trump signed into law the “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act” (“CARES Act”), which provides emergency assistance and health care response for individuals, families and businesses affected by the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. Included in the legislation is over-the-counter (OTC) drug reform, which impacts how sunscreens are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“In the U.S., FDA regulates OTCs under a monograph system, which establishes various requirements for approval, including the safety and effectiveness of active ingredients in sunscreens.  The legislation retains the regulations in the final monograph issued in 1999, which, among other things, confirms that active ingredients currently used in sunscreens on the market today are generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE).

“Because of their well-established role in protecting public health, the significant benefits sunscreens provide should be appropriately weighed against any potential risks. We support FDA’s commitment to ensuring that sunscreens are safe and effective for their intended use. We are confident that currently marketed sunscreens are safe and effective based on the long history of safe use of these products in the United States and around the world, the breadth of existing safety data, and the established benefits sunscreens provide.

“The dangers of sun exposure are clear and universally recognized by dermatologists and other public health professionals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation and health care professionals worldwide emphasize the important role of sunscreen use as part of a safe sun regimen.

“Skin cancer is a significant, and largely preventable, public health concern. Our industry’s goal continues to be to help consumers make informed decisions and use sunscreen as an important part of an overall safe sun program. We are proud that our industry offers innovative sunscreen products that help protect consumers from the harmful effects of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays.

“Ultimately, having an array of safe and effective sunscreen active ingredients allows sunscreen manufacturers to formulate products that meet the differing needs of individuals and their families.  Ensuring that consumers have access to these products containing a broad variety of sunscreen active ingredients is critical and an important contribution to FDA’s public health mission.”

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For more information on cosmetics and personal care products, please visit www.CosmeticsInfo.org.

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing global cosmetics and personal care products companies. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s approximately 600 member companies manufacture, distribute and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on and trust every day – from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance – personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation.

Statement by the Personal Care Products Council and the Consumer Healthcare Products Association in Response to Part Two of FDA’s Sunscreen Ingredient Maximal Usage Trial


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:

Jewel Jones (202) 454-0302, jonesj@personalcarecouncil.org
Lauren Bloomberg, (202) 429-3534, lbloomberg@chpa.org

Washington, D.C. — “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) sponsored study entitled ‘Effect of Sunscreen Application on Plasma Concentration of Sunscreen Active Ingredients’ published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a follow-up to an earlier study published in May 2019. Using a larger sample size, additional sunscreen active ingredients and formulations, the more recent study reached similar conclusions to those observed previously.

“All six sunscreen active ingredients were absorbed and found in plasma following application in either lotion or spray form.  However, the presence of these ingredients in plasma does not suggest a safety issue and there were no serious drug-related adverse events reported in the trial, consistent with the excellent safety record associated with sunscreen active ingredients over decades of real-world use. We will continue to work cooperatively with FDA to determine what additional studies are needed to ensure the ongoing safety of sunscreen active ingredients in the marketplace.

“The Personal Care Products Council (PCPC), the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) and their member companies are aligned with FDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Surgeon General, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation and health professionals worldwide about the important health benefits sunscreens provide as part of a safe sun regimen to help prevent sunburn and reduce skin cancer risk.

“FDA makes clear that the results of this study should not cause anyone to stop using sunscreen.  Sunscreen is a crucial step in the fight against skin cancer and premature skin aging. It is our hope that using sunscreen becomes as much of a habit as using a seat belt.

“We look forward to our continued work with FDA to ensure that consumers have access to products containing a broad variety of sunscreen active ingredients.”

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 About the Personal Care Products Council

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing the global cosmetic and personal care products industry. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s 600 member companies manufacture, distribute, and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on every day, from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance, personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation. For more information on cosmetics and their ingredients, please visit www.cosmeticsinfo.org.

 About the Consumer Healthcare Products Association

Founded in 1881, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, dietary supplements, and consumer medical devices. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system more than $7, contributing a total of $146 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products. www.chpa.org

 

Sound Science Must Guide Public Policy


Jay M. Ansell, PhD, DABT
VP, Cosmetics Program
Personal Care Products Council

As a scientist, I make up my mind based on the evidence. I may believe something is true, but then I have to put that belief to the test. Sometimes the evidence will show I was right. Other times, no matter how compelling or convenient my belief may be, if the evidence does not agree, then I have to change my mind. At the end of the day, the best decision-making is informed by facts, not opinions, beliefs or speculation.

The need for science to guide policy discussions is critical, and in the case of efforts to ban the sale and use of some sunscreens as a way to prevent damage to coral reefs, we have a good example of why science should inform public policy. Policymakers in Hawaii and Florida have recently passed legislation based on the speculation certain sunscreen ingredients harm coral reefs, while ignoring the proven benefits of sunscreens, potentially endangering the health of people visiting their beaches and living in their communities.

We know the greatest risk to coral reefs, and it is not people wearing sunscreen at the beach. The clear scientific consensus is that the chief cause of coral reef decline is increasing ocean temperatures due to climate change, in combination with overfishing and water pollution from wastewater treatment plants, agricultural runoff, industrial discharges and other sources. By supporting misguided bans on the sale and use of these sunscreens, policymakers are diverting people from finding real solutions while jeopardizing public health.

Medical, scientific and public health experts all agree using sunscreen is a critical part of an overall sun safety regimen. Unprotected exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a known cause of skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, more than five million Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer this year—more than all other cancers combined. One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, every hour, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

So, if we care about protecting public health and the coral reefs, there are steps we can take right now to make a difference.
Here’s what the personal care products industry is doing to address climate change, the chief cause of coral reef decline:

  • Reducing Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions – More than two thirds of Personal Care Products Council member companies are actively managing energy use and carbon emission from their operations. Many companies support the Science Based Targets Initiative (SBTi) and have committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement – to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C.
  • Water Conservation and Management – Many companies have set ambitious public targets to reduce water consumption, increase water reuse and improve overall water efficiency in operations.
  • Zero Waste – Several companies are leading the way when it comes to achieving the goal of creating zero waste in their production and supply chain – from product design, manufacturing, logistics, and supply chain decisions to waste management and recycling considerations.

Every consumer can play a role to play too — small scale changes can make a big difference. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, here’s what you can do every day:

  • Take care of your trash. If you take it to the beach, be sure to take it home – especially plastic. And don’t forget the three R’s (reduce, reuse, and recycle).
  • Minimize use of fertilizers. Nutrients in fertilizers (nitrogen and phosphorus) can runoff and get into waterways and eventually end up in oceans, where they degrade water quality.
  • Reduce stormwater runoff. Homeowners can install water catchments or rain gardens and use rain barrels to collect rainwater that would otherwise be diverted to storm drains, which eventually flow from our waterways into the ocean.
  • Use environmentally-friendly modes of transportation. Using cleaner transportation methods can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to ocean acidification and increased ocean temperature.

We all share the goal of protecting the Earth’s treasures, including the coral reefs, while addressing climate change and water quality issues. Let’s focus on solutions that target the real problems and not let ourselves be distracted by proposals that do nothing to help—and in fact could cause real harm.

Don’t Get Burned by Misleading Sunscreen Claims


Lisa Powers
EVP, Public Affairs & Communications
Personal Care Products Council

As a communicator, being informed is a top priority – in all aspects of my life. When considering a new product to purchase, for instance, I look to science and research to provide objective information and help me make a data-driven choice… and I’m not alone. According to a recent poll by NORC, public confidence in the scientific community has remained largely stable since the 1970s, which is why I find it so confusing that the credibility and reliability of science is suddenly up for debate.

I am not a scientist, but I’ve worked with many over the years and am consistently impressed by the rigor of their approach and work. Rather than relying on gut instinct or emotions like many of us do, scientists carefully examine and consider established data to guide their work and recommendations. They go where the facts lead them, even if the facts disrupt their journey. (The scientific method provides an organized way in to answer a question, test a hypothesis, or solve a problem.)

We could all use a little more objectivity – a little less assumption – in our lives. What is most concerning recently is the willful disregard for (and, in some cases, blatant misrepresentation of) science when it comes to the safety and benefits of sunscreens.

According to the American Cancer Society, more than five million Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer this year—more than all other types of cancer combined. One in five will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma – the deadliest form of skin cancer – every hour, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

Medical and scientific experts around the world agree sunscreen is a critical part of an overall sun safety regimen, but you wouldn’t know it by consuming today’s news.

You may, instead, be led to believe that sunscreen is harmful to your health or to the environment, or worse yet, that using it should be a last resort. These reports irresponsibly misrepresent the well-established scientific evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of sunscreen. What’s even more alarming? Some of these statements misrepresent the position of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates sunscreens and has the authority to remove them from the market, were they to have any safety concerns.

When false and misleading statements are picked up by the media, it risks confusing – even potentially harming – consumers. Put another way, while unsubstantiated claims might make for catchy headlines, they can undermine confidence in the products that protect us.

Fact: Sunscreens on the market today are backed by decades of safe use to help adults and children guard against the dangers of sun exposure. The FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Surgeon General, AAD, Skin Cancer Foundation, and health professionals worldwide consistently advocate for the use of broad-spectrum sunscreens as part of a safe-sun regimen. These products play a critical role in the fight against skin cancer and premature skin aging.

With summer in full swing, as my loved ones and I begin to spend more time outdoors, we won’t be ignoring decades of science and research in favor of sensationalized news stories. I will grab my hat, long sleeve shirt, and favorite bottle of sunscreen… confident I am following the best scientific and medical advice available to protect us from the harmful effects of the sun.

The Personal Care Products Council and Consumer Healthcare Products Association Submit Joint Comments to FDA on the Sunscreen Tentative Final Monograph


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS:
Lisa Powers, (202) 466-0489, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org
Mike Tringale, (202) 429-3520, mtringale@chpa.org

Washington, D.C. – The Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) and Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) submitted comments to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in response to the Sunscreen Tentative Final Monograph (TFM).

The industry organizations note sunscreens are important products that protect consumers from the harmful effects of ultra-violet (UV) radiation and, most importantly, play a critical role in the fight against skin cancer – the most common form of cancer in the United States. FDA recently said, “given the recognized public health benefits of sunscreen use, Americans should continue to use sunscreen with other sun protective measures as this important rulemaking effort moves forward.”

The comments submitted by PCPC and CHPA, together with their member companies, outlined suggestions to the TFM that will help the industry continue to formulate a broad range of innovative sunscreen products that help protect consumers from the harmful effects of the sun’s UV rays while accommodating their product preferences. The Executive Summary can be found here.

Industry is committed to continue working in partnership with FDA to develop a work-plan for identifying existing data and generating additional data to support the safety of sunscreen active ingredients. Ultimately, having a greater number of sunscreen filters allows manufacturers to formulate safe and effective products to meet the diverse needs of individuals and their families, while providing necessary protection against the damaging effects of the sun.

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Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing global cosmetics and personal care products companies. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s approximately 600 member companies manufacture, distribute and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on and trust every day – from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance – personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation. For more information on cosmetics and personal care products, please visit www.CosmeticsInfo.org.

 The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the 138-year-old national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and dietary supplements. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system more than $7, contributing a total of $146 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products. www.chpa.org.

Joint Statement from the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) and Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) Regarding EWG Annual Sunscreen Guide


Contacts:

Lauren Bloomberg, 202.429.3534, lbloomberg@chpa.org
Lisa Powers, 202.466.0489, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org

“The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) and the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) believe the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) 2019 sunscreen guide irresponsibly misrepresents the evidence base surrounding sunscreen safety and efficacy. The group’s new report risks creating consumer confusion and fear rather than promoting accurate sun safety and health education as Americans prepare for the Memorial Day holiday.

“Sunscreens are regulated as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), and EWG is misrepresenting FDA’s sentiments about current sunscreens following a proposed rule earlier this year when the FDA commissioner stated, ‘our proposed sunscreen rule is just that, a proposed rule…we think with incremental data we can issue final orders on many ingredients solidifying confidence in their safety.’ FDA went on to further stress, ‘the public should continue to use sunscreens with other sun protective measures. Broad spectrum sunscreens with SPF values of at least 15 remain a critical element of a skin-cancer prevention strategy.’

“Sunscreens on the market today are backed by decades of safe use to help adults and children guard against the dangers of excess sun exposure. EWG’s assertion that sunscreen should be a last resort is dangerous. The FDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Surgeon General, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation, and health professionals worldwide consistently advocate the use of broad spectrum sunscreens as part of a safe-sun regimen. These products play a critical role in the fight against skin cancer.”

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The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the 138-year-old national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and dietary supplements. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system more than $7, contributing a total of $146 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products. www.chpa.org

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing global cosmetics and personal care products companies. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s approximately 600 member companies manufacture, distribute, and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the United States. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on and trust every day – from sunscreens, toothpaste, and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick, and fragrance – personal care products companies are global leaders committed to safety, quality, and innovation. www.personalcarecouncil.org

Alexandra Kowcz, Chief Scientist, Personal Care Products Council in Response to FDA’s Sunscreen Ingredient Maximal Usage Trial


Contacts:

Lisa Powers, (202) 466-0489, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org
Jewel Jones, (202) 454-0302, jonesj@personalcarecouncil.org

Washington, D.C. – “The Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) and its member companies are aligned with the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Surgeon General, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation and health professionals worldwide about the important health benefits that sunscreens provide as part of a safe sun regimen to help prevent sunburn and reduce skin cancer risk.

“It’s important to note that the FDA states that the results of the study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) should not cause anyone to refrain from using sunscreen, and we agree.  We want to ensure that consumers continue to have confidence in the safety of the products that they trust and have used every day for years.

“It’s important for consumers to know that for the purpose of this study, the levels of sunscreens used may not be reflective of how people use sunscreen products in the real world. The study also looked at sunscreen presence in plasma – and as FDA’s own note on the study reiterated, the mere presence of a chemical or chemicals does not suggest a safety issue.

“We look forward to our continued work with the FDA to ensure that consumers have access to products containing a broad variety of sunscreen active ingredients.”

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For more information on cosmetics and personal care products, please visit www.CosmeticsInfo.org.

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing global cosmetics and personal care products companies. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s approximately 600 member companies manufacture, distribute and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on and trust every day – from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance – personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation.

Statement from the Personal Care Products Council on FDA’s Tentative Final Monograph for Sunscreen


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS:  

Lisa Powers, (202) 297-1232, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org
Jamie Kurke, (202) 258-5285, kurkej@personalcarecouncil.org

 

Washington, D.C. – “Sunscreens are central in the fight against skin cancer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation and health care professionals worldwide all emphasize the importance of sunscreen use as part of a safe sun regimen. The dangers of sun exposure are clear and universally recognized by public health professionals and dermatologists. As part of their regulation of sunscreens, the FDA recently published a proposed rule, the long-anticipated Sunscreen Tentative Final Monograph (TFM).

“In the U.S., sunscreens are regulated by FDA as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. OTC drugs are currently regulated under a monograph system, which establishes various requirements for approval. Among other items, the proposed rule addresses the effectiveness and safety of the active ingredients that sunscreens are permitted to include in their formulation. In this proposed rule, FDA identified two ingredients, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, that meet FDA’s established conditions for safety and effectiveness.

“FDA requested the industry conduct additional testing on twelve ingredients currently used in sunscreens around the world. These twelve ingredients have been confirmed as both safe and effective in Europe and other countries around the world.   While FDA proposed certain methodologies for this testing, our industry has consistently offered viable, state-of-the-art toxicological safety methods as alternatives to the historical methods proposed by FDA.  We remain firm in our belief that the precise studies proposed by FDA are not the only ways to obtain the data they need.

“Importantly, sunscreens made with these ingredients will remain on the market.  FDA noted in its press release, ‘Given the recognized public health benefits of sunscreen use, Americans should continue to use sunscreen with other sun protective measures as this important rulemaking effort moves forward.’ We are proud of the sunscreens our industry provides to protect families from the harmful effects of the sun. We look forward to working with FDA to best address their questions.

“Skin cancer is a significant, and largely preventable, public health concern. Our industry’s goal is and continues to be to help consumers make informed decisions and use sunscreen as an important part of an overall safe sun program. We are proud that our industry offers innovative sunscreen products that help protect consumers from the harmful effects of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. We believe it is important to note that the TFM reflects sunscreen innovation in dosage forms and recognizes the importance of sunscreens at various SPF values, including those above SPF 50.

“Ultimately, having an array of safe and effective sunscreen active ingredients allows sunscreen manufacturers to formulate safe and effective products that meet the differing needs of individuals and their families, while providing necessary protection against the damaging effects of the sun.  Ensuring that consumers have access to products containing a broad variety of sunscreen active ingredients is critical and an important contribution to FDA’s public health mission.”

For more information about cosmetics and personal care products and their ingredients, please visit www.cosmeticsinfo.org.

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council is the leading national trade association representing the global cosmetic and personal care products industry. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s 600 member companies manufacture, distribute, and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on every day, from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance, personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation.

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Statement from the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) and the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) Regarding Sunscreen Ingredient Ban


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Contacts:

Mike Tringale, 202.429.3520, mtringale@chpa.org
Lisa Powers, 202.466.0489, powersl@personalcarecouncil.org

“The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) and Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) are disappointed with the action taken by the Key West City Commission to ban certain sunscreen ingredients found in numerous sunscreens, cosmetics, shampoos, lip balms, and other health and personal care products. While we respect the emotion around coral reef decline, the ban represents a bad policy that is not based on scientific evidence. This ban is unlikely to have a positive effect on Florida’s coral but it will have a profound negative impact on the health and wellbeing of residents and visitors in Key West.

“Oxybenzone and octinoxate contribute to broad-spectrum protection from the effects of both UVA and UVB rays. UVA and UVB rays contribute to skin damage, skin aging, and melanoma, the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths. Manufacturers, health professionals, and many others are opposed to a ban on these ingredients which provide critical defense against excess ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. Banning these ingredients will drastically – and unnecessarily – reduce the selection of safe and effective sunscreens and other products available to residents and visitors in Key West.

“There is no definitive scientific evidence that products containing oxybenzone or octinoxate damage coral in natural environments like Key West, nor any evidence that banning these ingredients improves the plight of coral. The ingredient ban in Key West ignores the real causes of coral decline according to scientists in Florida and from around the world: global warming, agricultural runoff, sewage, and overfishing. Public policy that will likely adversely impact public health should not be based on a limited number of exploratory lab-based studies alone.

“Oxybenzone and octinoxate, found in the majority of sunscreens in the U.S., are safe and effective over-the-counter (OTC) active ingredients recognized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an important aide in decreasing the risk of developing skin cancer – the most common cancer in the U.S.”

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The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the 138-year-old national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and dietary supplements. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system $6-$7, contributing a total of $102 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products. www.chpa.org

Based in Washington, D.C., the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC) is the leading national trade association representing global cosmetics and personal care products companies. Founded in 1894, PCPC’s approximately 600 member companies manufacture, distribute and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the U.S. As the makers of a diverse range of products millions of consumers rely on and trust every day – from sunscreens, toothpaste and shampoo to moisturizer, lipstick and fragrance – personal care products companies are global leaders committed to product safety, quality and innovation.

For more information on cosmetics and personal care products, please visit www.CosmeticsInfo.org

Statement by Alex Kowcz, Chief Scientist Personal Care Products Council On Restricting the Use of Sunscreens in Hawaii


July 3, 2018

Washington, D.C. – “Recent legislation in Hawaii has banned two important ingredients, both approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in sunscreen products, based on mistaken beliefs about these ingredients that puts Hawaiians at greater risk of skin cancer.

“We join with Hawaiians in a shared concern for the environment—particularly the coral reefs—while seeking to provide a variety of safe, high-quality personal care products that meet the preferences of today’s diverse consumers.

“For cosmetics and personal care products companies, science serves as the foundation for everything that they do. The industry remains very concerned that the policy decision to prohibit Hawaiians’ access to sunscreen products with oxybenzone and octinoxate is based on inadequate scientific studies that do not meet the required quality controls used by regulatory bodies worldwide in making legislative and public health decisions. Credible environmental experts acknowledge that climate change, over-fishing and sewage run-off cause harm to coral – not sunscreens.

“These well-intentioned but misguided changes in policy may yield little to no environmental benefit to Hawaii, while at the same time restricting consumer choice, reducing access to cancer-protecting sunscreens, and likely increasing exposure to the devastation of skin cancer.

“Our goal is to provide education and information that helps consumers make informed decisions about the safe use of sunscreen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the Skin Cancer Foundation and health care professionals worldwide all emphasize the importance of sunscreen use as part of a safe sun regimen. Daily use of sunscreens is a crucial step in the fight against skin cancer and premature skin aging. It is our hope that using sunscreens becomes as much of a habit as putting on your seatbelt.”